The UN IS NOT YOUR FRIEND – Part 11 – COVID 19 – DEPOPULATION, REWILDING AND CLIMATE RESET

COVID 19 is everyday manifesting the UN/ELITE/ROYAL Agenda.  I hope that you are awake and observant.  This year is going to be a very big year for you.  YOUR LIFE if you continue to have one, is NEVER GOING TO BE THE SAME AGAIN.  THAT IS A PROMISE!  

Please as you review the items posted here, don’t just peruse through them and take them at face  value.  READ these article with a critical and analytical mind.  Most of all PRAY that God will reveal the TRUTH to you.  All the deceptive fluff and hype that is being thrown at the general public makes it very hard for the regular, average person to sort out.  That is why there are people on the internet who are dedicated to sorting it all out and presenting you with TRUTH.  We can’t make you see it… all we can do is put it out there.

I encourage you to check out the UN 2020 Website.  These people are deadly serious about the GLOBAL GOVERNMENT being in place by the end of 2020!

 

UN75 People’s Declaration

The UN2020 campaign is working to develop a civil society Declaration and Plan of Action to be adopted at the UN75 People’s Forum for The Future We Want, The UN We Need  taking place on
……tentatively planned for May 14, 2020 

Your inputs will inform the content of the Declaration and the advocacy going forward, as UN member states also negotiate the intergovernmental UN75 political declaration, which is to be completed by June and adopted by Heads of State at the

..UN75 Leaders Summit on September 19, 2020

SPACER

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Note the colors on their Logo. 

Lockdowns due to Coronavirus have kept millions of people in their homes — and social distancing measures meant to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus — have brought clear skies, quiet streets and tranquil shores. These are challenging times for humanity. But for many of Earth’s other inhabitants, there’s a silver lining. Many animals that have become habituated to humans especially for food are having a bad time. Would request people moving out incase of emergencies to carry some biscuits / food if possible for these animals and to leave water bowls at the gate. The lockdowns have however affected not just human beings but the animals on the streets too who find themselves hungry and destitute in these trying times. The video has been compiled using media from different sources. The original creator is difficult to identify. A special thanks to the Facebook Group “Nature revives 🍃 Lockdown 2020”

April 4, 2020

With humans in lockdown, animals seem to be reclaiming what is rightfully theirs as well. The Social distancing has proved to be a boon for the Mother Earth, as she can rejuvenate and recover her energies. Things seem hard and challenging for humans, but for the other species it’s a beautiful opportunity to wander and discover all that they have been denied. They are inching forward to claim their stakes, their share of happiness and freedom that the man had caged. Let’s pledge to share this World with all species and not destroy and encroach upon their habitats for our greed. The video has been compiled using media from different sources. The original creator is difficult to identify. A special thanks to the Facebook Group “Nature revives 🍃 Lockdown 2020” https://www.facebook.com/groups/28903…

With so many humans staying at home, the air is cleaner, the water is clearer and some animals are more bold than ever.  (Damn those pesky humans, wish they would all just stay away forever!)

Eric Mack mugshot

china-trop-2020056
NO2 amounts have dropped with the coronavirus quarantine, Chinese New Year, and a related economic slowdown.NASA
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

The coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19, have taken millions of people off the streets in China, Europe and the United States. And all those people staying home seem to be a collective weight off the shoulders of the global environment in certain observable ways.  (you don’t think that was the plan???)

NASA and the European Space Agency first saw the effect via via satellite data (above) that shows China’s dramatic drop in nitrogen dioxide emissions, which mostly come from vehicles, after lockdowns were put in place in February. (Funny how they didn’t see all the smoke rising up from the incinerators they had going 24/7)

The European Space Agency’s Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite also made it easy to see similar reductions in air pollution over northern Italy after lockdowns were put in place there a few weeks later. The below animation shows the fluctuation of nitrogen dioxide emissions between Jan. 1 and March 11.

The reduction in emissions that we can see, coincides with the lockdown in Italy causing less traffic and industrial activities,” said Claus Zehner, ESA’s Copernicus Sentinel-5P mission manager, said in a blog post. 

(Well, dah. It does not take a scientist to figure that.  When we are not driving the gas gusler cars the greedy elite have us driving there are no emissions to measure)Similar impacts are evident in the suddenly pristine air quality around Los Angeles, which is normally notorious for its smog from millions of commuters. (Wow, really? How shocking…NOT)

One place it’s easy to see the environmental change with your own eyes by simply taking a walk around town is the famed canal city of Venice.

The water in the canals, which have a reputation for being a bit stinky at times, is currently clear with plenty of fish swimming and swans hanging around enjoying the unusual urban peace and quiet:

Some wildlife that have become dependent on humans as a source of food are now becoming a bit more rowdy and bold in this new reality. (Ya, animals and humans get rowdy when they are hungry!!  And how is this Pandemic solving the food shorage problem? NOT! So now we have hungry animals roaming our streets!)

Deer who live in Japan’s Nara Park are used to being fed by park visitors, but with that meal ticket suddenly dried up, they’ve left the park and taken to the streets of the city to look for food.

Similar and uglier scenes have been recorded in places like Lopburi, Thailand, where local monkeys previously able to rely on tourists for food have mobbed the town in search of sustenance, sometimes brawling each other in the process.

Shutdowns are likely to impact the amount of carbon in the atmosphere as well.

According to an analysis by Lauri Myllyvirta at the Center for Research on Energy and Clean Air, in the weeks that followed the end of Chinese New Year in early February the coronavirus lockdown kept activity in the country from resuming like it normally would. The resulting reductions in coal and crude oil burning led to a 25 percent decrease in CO2 emissions from China when compared with the same period in 2019. (NO DUH)

“This amounts to approximately 100 metric tons of CO2, or 6% of global emissions over the same period,” Myllyvirta writes.(Well that ought to get poor little GRETA THUNBERG jumping for joy!)

These are dramatic times that will surely lead to more dramatic and unexpected changes. Just be sure to maintain social distancing from both your fellow humans and hungry monkeys.

Now playing:Pandemic: Here’s what’s changed about the coronavirus

An Analysis of the Impact of the CoronaVirus Lockdown on our Environment.

Mayukh Bhattacharyya
Mar 29 · 5 min read

Photo by Thom Holmes on Unsplash

updated with latest data till 4th April

You may have seen the tweets, or even worse, you may have even shared the news; that there are dolphins and swans in Venice or there are elephants in China, all roaming around freely in this fresh and pure human-free world. We all want to believe in something good in this torrid time but it turns out those news and images were fake, well not totally fake, just not related to the current coronavirus lockdown throughout the world. Dolphins and swans were always in Venice and the photo of elephants is an old one.

So the question arises is if it’s the same old earth or is it just a little bit better? To cut through the noise and uncover the real truth, I decided to go through the data. Air Quality Index(AQI) is a pretty robust metric which reflects the air pollution levels and hence a very good way to understand the impact of the lockdown, at least on our lower atmosphere. You can see the variations of pollutant levels over the world with each passing week here at CovidExplore.com.

NO2 concentration since the 1st week of 2020. The Climate Side of COVID-19

I know, right? You can see the drastic differences between the end of January (week 5) and right now. Specifically, the NO2 levels have taken a huge hit since there are practically no cars on the street and very few industries operating. The most differences will be seen for Italy, Spain, Iran where the most stringent lockdowns are in place to tackle the widespread of the virus.

CovidExplore.com was created with this github repository: https://github.com/mayukh18/covidexplore .

Clearer water, cleaner air: The environmental effects of coronavirus

Vwnice, Italy. © AFP / FRANCE 24

From crystal clear waters in the canals of Venice to dramatic falls in pollution levels in major cities, the coronavirus pandemic has had a number of positive effects on the environment as millions across the world are placed under lockdown.

The crowds of tourists who normally swarm the Venice canals are gone and the number of motorboats vastly reduced.

As a consequence, the normally polluted waters of the canals are clearer than at any time many locals can remember.

“The canal is definitely clearer, you just have to look at the canal when water is very calm. There are no boats, there is no traffic. Definitely it is cleaner,” said Venice resident Serguei Michtchenk.

It is just one of the possibly beneficial effects on the environment of the coronavirus pandemic.

In cities across the world, the streets have emptied of people and vehicles, factories have shut down and flights have been grounded.

In China, satellite images from NASA and the European Space Agency have shown a significant decrease in nitrogen dioxide pollution in the early months of this year after much of the country went into lockdown.

A similar effect has been seen in northern Italy. While in New York, scientists at Columbia University reported a 5-10 percent drop in CO2 emissions this week as traffic levels fell 35 percent.

But the environmental benefits could be short-lived. China this week began reopening factories in Hubei province as the country reported no new domestic coronavirus cases for the first time.

Down to Earth

Coronavirus lockdown: What impact on the planet?

DOWN TO EARTH
DOWN TO EARTH © FRANCE 24

Three and a half billion people are confined in some way around the planet. That’s almost half of the world’s population. The Covid-19 pandemic has drastically changed our daily lives. With travel halted and industries slowed or stopped, what does that mean for the environment? What effect could it have on efforts to fight climate change? Down to Earth’s team takes a look at carbon emissions, pollution, recycling and the impact on agriculture in this special episode in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus shutdowns have unintended climate benefits: cleaner air, clearer water

“I think there are some big-picture lessons here that could be very useful,” one scientist said. 
 Click one of the links below to view this video.
This is a VERY IMPORTANT VIDEO.   IF you can watch this video and not realize this was a reset designed to get us out of our cars and out of our houses, than I don’t know what I can say.  WAKE UP!!!

Coronavirus shutdowns have unintended climate benefits: cleaner air, clearer water

“I think there are some big-picture lessons here that could be very useful,” one scientist said.
By Denise Chow

In Venice, the often murky canals recently began to get clearer, with fish visible in the water below. Italy’s efforts to limit the coronavirus meant an absence of boat traffic on the city’s famous waterways. And the changes happened quickly.

Countries that have been under stringent lockdowns to stop the spread of the coronavirus have experienced an unintended benefit. The outbreak has, at least in part, contributed to a noticeable drop in pollution and greenhouse gas emissions in some countries.

Although grim, it’s something scientists said could offer tough lessons for how to prepare — and ideally avoid — the most destructive impacts of climate change.

IMAGE: Canal in Venice
Water in Venice’s canals appeared to run clearer in the absence of boat traffic in early March.Marco Capovilla / Venezia Pulita

“If we can think about how to prepare for climate change like a pandemic, maybe there will be a positive outcome to all of this,” said Christopher Jones, lead developer of the CoolClimate Network, an applied research consortium at the University of California, Berkeley. “We can help prevent crises in the future if we are prepared. I think there are some big-picture lessons here that could be very useful.”

The coronavirus pandemic has sickened more than 180,000 people and killed more than 7,100 worldwide since early January. Some countries, most notably China and Italy, have been forced to seal their borders and restrict residents’ movements to control the rates of infection.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

Satellite observations have shown that the temporary measures have also driven significant decreases in harmful emissions.

“Carbon dioxide is tied to industrial activity, electricity production and transportation, so anything that affects those sectors will impact greenhouse gases, as well,” Jones said.

The coronavirus first emerged in late December in Wuhan, China. As it rapidly spilled into neighboring regions, the Chinese government locked down the city, quarantining 11 million people in Wuhan. Eventually, the lockdown would include almost 60 million people in the province of Hubei.

According to Lauri Myllyvirta, an analyst at the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air in Finland, the restrictions contributed to a 25 percent drop in China’s carbon dioxide emissions over four weeks beginning in late January, compared to the same time last year.

Myllyvirta’s analysis also found that industrial operations were reduced by 15 percent to 40 percent in some sectors and that coal consumption at power plants fell by 36 percent.

Pollution-monitoring satellites operated by NASA and the European Space Agency observed drastic decreases in air pollution over China over two weeks in February when the quarantine was in effect. The satellites measured concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, which is released by cars, power plants and industrial facilities, from Jan. 1 to Jan. 20 and again from Feb. 10 to Feb. 25. The difference was unmistakable.

 

Clearer waters in Venice in early March were an unintended climate benefit of the coronavirus lockdowns in Italy.Marco Capovilla / Venezia Pulita

The cloud of nitrogen dioxide that was parked over China in January seemed to evaporate in February. NASA scientists said that similar emissions reductions have been observed in other countries during economic disruptions but that the sharp decrease in air pollution in China during the quarantine period was especially rapid.

“This is the first time I have seen such a dramatic dropoff over such a wide area for a specific event,” Fei Liu, an air quality researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said in a statement this month.

Pollution levels have similarly decreased over Italy, which has become the center of the coronavirus pandemic outside China. On March 8, as cases spiked, Italy locked down its northern Lombardy region. Two days later, the prime minister expanded the quarantine to include the entire country.

Empty streets around the Moulin Rouge in Paris after COVID-19 lockdown

March 17, 202001:06

Nitrogen dioxide can irritate the lungs, and inhaling the pollutant can increase the risk of asthma and inflammation of the lungs. Although the noxious gas isn’t thought to be a major contributor to climate change, studying its concentration in the atmosphere can help scientists understand other heat-trapping greenhouse gases that do drive global warming.

Jacqueline Klopp, co-director of the Center for Sustainable Urban Development at Columbia University in New York City, said she expects to see greenhouse gas emissions plummet across the board because of the quarantine measures.

Download the NBC News app for full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

“People were in their homes and really stopped a lot of the activities that lead to greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution,” she said.

Early observations have shown that extreme social-distancing measures are likely also having an effect on air pollution at the city level in the U.S.

Jordan Wildish, a project director at Earth Economics, an environmental non-profit organization based in Tacoma, Washington, developed an online dashboard to track air quality in San Francisco, New York City and the Seattle area, comparing the measurements with figures from the same time last year.

In San Francisco, which is under shelter-in-place orders to control the spread of the coronavirus, the average concentration of fine particulate matter — tiny particles in the air that are dangerous because they can be breathed deeply into the lungs — over the past five days was almost 40 percent lower than the previous year.

In New York City, there was a 28 percent drop over the same period of time, and the Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue saw a 32 percent decrease.

But experts warned that observed reductions are temporary and that as cities, countries and economies bounce back, so, too, will emissions — unless major infrastructure or societal changes are adopted.

Klopp said the pandemic could make companies and governments realize that other threats to humanity, including climate change, could be just as devastating and that it’s imperative to develop protective measures.

“As we move to restart these economies, we need to use this moment to think about what we value,” she said. “Do we want to go back to the status quo, or do we want to tackle these big structural problems and restructure our economy and reduce emissions and pollution?”

Image: Denise ChowDenise Chow

Denise Chow is a reporter for NBC News Science focused on the environment and space.  

MARCH 31, 202004:34

By Denise Chow

In Venice, the often murky canals recently began to get clearer, with fish visible in the water below. Italy’s efforts to limit the coronavirus meant an absence of boat traffic on the city’s famous waterways. And the changes happened quickly.

Countries that have been under stringent lockdowns to stop the spread of the coronavirus have experienced an unintended benefit. The outbreak has, at least in part, contributed to a noticeable drop in pollution and greenhouse gas emissions in some countries.

Although grim, it’s something scientists said could offer tough lessons for how to prepare — and ideally avoid — the most destructive impacts of climate change.

IMAGE: Canal in Venice
Water in Venice’s canals appeared to run clearer in the absence of boat traffic in early March.Marco Capovilla / Venezia Pulita

“If we can think about how to prepare for climate change like a pandemic, maybe there will be a positive outcome to all of this,” said Christopher Jones, lead developer of the CoolClimate Network, an applied research consortium at the University of California, Berkeley. “We can help prevent crises in the future if we are prepared. I think there are some big-picture lessons here that could be very useful.”

The coronavirus pandemic has sickened more than 180,000 people and killed more than 7,100 worldwide since early January. Some countries, most notably China and Italy, have been forced to seal their borders and restrict residents’ movements to control the rates of infection.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

Satellite observations have shown that the temporary measures have also driven significant decreases in harmful emissions.

“Carbon dioxide is tied to industrial activity, electricity production and transportation, so anything that affects those sectors will impact greenhouse gases, as well,” Jones said.

NASA Earth

@NASAEarth

Nitrogen dioxide over has dropped with the coronavirus quarantine, Chinese New Year, and a related economic slowdown. https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/146362/airborne-nitrogen-dioxide-plummets-over-china 

View image on TwitterView image on Twitter
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The coronavirus first emerged in late December in Wuhan, China. As it rapidly spilled into neighboring regions, the Chinese government locked down the city, quarantining 11 million people in Wuhan. Eventually, the lockdown would include almost 60 million people in the province of Hubei.

Industrial operations in the coronavirus hot spot ground to a halt, and travel restrictions within China meant that air, rail and road traffic were paused or scaled back across some regions.

According to Lauri Myllyvirta, an analyst at the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air in Finland, the restrictions contributed to a 25 percent drop in China’s carbon dioxide emissions over four weeks beginning in late January, compared to the same time last year.

Myllyvirta’s analysis also found that industrial operations were reduced by 15 percent to 40 percent in some sectors and that coal consumption at power plants fell by 36 percent.

Pollution-monitoring satellites operated by NASA and the European Space Agency observed drastic decreases in air pollution over China over two weeks in February when the quarantine was in effect. The satellites measured concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, which is released by cars, power plants and industrial facilities, from Jan. 1 to Jan. 20 and again from Feb. 10 to Feb. 25. The difference was unmistakable.

IMAGE: A canal in Venice
Clearer waters in Venice in early March were an unintended climate benefit of the coronavirus lockdowns in Italy.Marco Capovilla / Venezia Pulita

The cloud of nitrogen dioxide that was parked over China in January seemed to evaporate in February. NASA scientists said that similar emissions reductions have been observed in other countries during economic disruptions but that the sharp decrease in air pollution in China during the quarantine period was especially rapid.

“This is the first time I have seen such a dramatic dropoff over such a wide area for a specific event,” Fei Liu, an air quality researcher at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said in a statement this month.

Pollution levels have similarly decreased over Italy, which has become the center of the coronavirus pandemic outside China. On March 8, as cases spiked, Italy locked down its northern Lombardy region. Two days later, the prime minister expanded the quarantine to include the entire country.

 

Empty streets around the Moulin Rouge in Paris after COVID-19 lockdown

MARCH 17, 202001:06

Nitrogen dioxide can irritate the lungs, and inhaling the pollutant can increase the risk of asthma and inflammation of the lungs. Although the noxious gas isn’t thought to be a major contributor to climate change, studying its concentration in the atmosphere can help scientists understand other heat-trapping greenhouse gases that do drive global warming.

Jacqueline Klopp, co-director of the Center for Sustainable Urban Development at Columbia University in New York City, said she expects to see greenhouse gas emissions plummet across the board because of the quarantine measures.

Download the NBC News app for full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

“People were in their homes and really stopped a lot of the activities that lead to greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution,” she said.

Early observations have shown that extreme social-distancing measures are likely also having an effect on air pollution at the city level in the U.S.

Jordan Wildish, a project director at Earth Economics, an environmental non-profit organization based in Tacoma, Washington, developed an online dashboard to track air quality in San Francisco, New York City and the Seattle area, comparing the measurements with figures from the same time last year.

In San Francisco, which is under shelter-in-place orders to control the spread of the coronavirus, the average concentration of fine particulate matter — tiny particles in the air that are dangerous because they can be breathed deeply into the lungs — over the past five days was almost 40 percent lower than the previous year.

In New York City, there was a 28 percent drop over the same period of time, and the Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue saw a 32 percent decrease.

But experts warned that observed reductions are temporary and that as cities, countries and economies bounce back, so, too, will emissions — unless major infrastructure or societal changes are adopted.

Klopp said the pandemic could make companies and governments realize that other threats to humanity, including climate change, could be just as devastating and that it’s imperative to develop protective measures.

“As we move to restart these economies, we need to use this moment to think about what we value,” she said. “Do we want to go back to the status quo, or do we want to tackle these big structural problems and restructure our economy and reduce emissions and pollution?”

But, let’s get down to the real heartbreak… People.  People are paying a very high cost through this Pandemic.  For the most part, people were caught unware.  Very few people had any idea how fast the world could change, or how devastating those changes could be.  

Every one that I talk to says the same thing.  “This is one crazy world we are living in”

They just shake their heads and no one has any idea what is going to happen or when this is all going to end.  When it does…what will our reality be like?

In the meantime.. how does one cope?  How do you face the fears.  Fears about if you will have any money, food, water, shelter.  How do deal with the lonliness, the inactivity, the boredom the overwhelming emptiness and hopelessness?  How do deal with the loss of loved ones, or worse yet, how do you watch them die?

Italy convinced people to stay home. Now it needs to help them cope

Milan
Luiz Romero

By Luiz Romero

Reporter

FROM OUR OBSESSION

Being Human

We’ve never been as connected, or as isolated.

Warnings about coronavirus—from “stay inside” to “wash your hands” to “cancel social gatherings”—have been largely accepted by Italians, but people here are growing increasingly anxious about the weeks-long lockdown, and need help dealing with the mental toll. Italy has exceeded 100,000 infections and 10,000 deaths, and Italians are entering their fourth week of isolation.

A new survey investigated how people are receiving and responding to public messaging about the coronavirus crisis. It was commissioned by the city of Rome, designed by an international group of social scientists, and carried out with a representative sample of the population earlier this month.

The results show that the majority of Italians trust the advice given by the government. “I believe that everyone should stay at home,” one respondent said. “I think the longer we stay inside, the sooner we get out,” said another. The researchers termed the level of acceptance to the messaging “remarkable”—better than public health campaigns on smoking, drinking, and exercising.

Health authorities update the population daily on TV, and the prime minister makes periodic televised addresses to the nation, which have contributed to a jump in his popularity. The government recently increased a fine for people caught outside from about €200 ($220) to between €400 and €3,000 ($440 to $3300), while mayors have been personally scolding people caught wandering around. The messaging is constant, and it’s working.

Shift in focus

But the authors of the study warn that the government has little to gain from repeating the same recommendations now that people are saturated with them. They advise the government to instead start helping people cope with the mental toll of being under lockdown.

Not even gonna go here… Just saying…  Today’s world is all about the migrants.

Coronavirus lockdown impact: We have to help the migrant find a home

It is not easy to work in an alien land. If Indians abroad complain of racial discrimination, north eastern Indians in Bengaluru suffer bullying too. The differences in our cultures, looks, food, language and habits show us up as outsiders.

ET CONTRIBUTORS|

By Uma Shashikant

15
Much needs to be done to protect the millions of labourers who work in our cities. Read more at: https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/wealth/plan/coronavirus-lockdown-impact-we-have-to-help-the-migrant-find-a-home/articleshow/74979368.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

How does one define home? The place one was born in? Where one works? Or is it where one lives with the family? Our need to be economic units that earn an income has made nomads of us, displacing us from our homes.

Consider the children of well-heeled parents who go abroad to study. They find jobs and settle in foreign locations and raise a family there. They are the proud achievers their parents and society brag about. Many middle class households crave for that possibility of a dollar income earning offspring.

Then consider those workers, walking home with children on their hips, belongings bundled on their head. They also moved to the big city in search of a better life and better income. How is it that we have nothing but pity and disdain for them? How are they different from the first lot?

How cruel is that economic reality that our earnings are in one place and our homes are in another, and we live a life torn between the two. What we call home is where we think we belong; a place that accepts and supports us. We give that warmth up for earning an income.

Except we do not see everyone out on this pursuit as equals. For one class we host an investment mela in a five star location; the other, we let them walk for miles without food or water, because we failed to account for how they could get home, safely and with dignity. Even while they bear the burden of having lost their livelihood.

It is not easy to work in an alien land. If Indians abroad complain of racial discrimination, north eastern Indians in Bengaluru suffer bullying too. The differences in our cultures, looks, food, language and habits show us up as outsiders. We suffer the ignominy because we need the job.
Those who already live there see us as desolate people who have to leave home to earn money. The parochial mindsets recognise locals as ‘us’, and outsiders as ‘them’. Those who have willingly uprooted themselves from the comfort of home, must be desperate. There is no acceptance or respect, and it comes grudgingly even if it does.

What does one do when there are no economic opportunities near home? How does one cope with poor quality education and mindless entrance exams? How does one get a place in the rat race for favours? One sets out into the big bad world, to find a place. To learn, to upskill, to work, to earn and to live.

The new place can become home. If one feels safe, secure, and knows someone will have their back when they are in trouble. Indians abroad gather into communities, lobby with local politicians, find their voices and carve out homes in a foreign land.

What would a migrant labourer do in a large alien city? He would try and stay close to others from his village. But he cannot make the new city his home. The city is a place that pays for labour, and has consistent work to offer. But there is no place to stay. Every square foot is expensive. Cost of living is high.

We are not talking of a few. Millions of migrant labourers, living in abominable conditions in our cities, contributing to its economic growth, but never able to call it home. They have to pick up their bundles and leave when a pandemic strikes because it is not their home.

We will argue about the unfair H1B process; the long line for green cards; the unfairness of spousal employment under H4; and about how the Indian immigrant is an important contributor to the Western economy. But the migrant worker who cannot afford to bring his wife to the city; the daily wage earner who hasn’t met his family in months; or the worker who only rents a bed and shares a bathroom with 10 roommates do not evoke our collective consciousness.

Thus we have the economic system that uses hands and legs, backs and bodies to build, clean, cart and drive, and feels it is a fair deal to pay humans for the actual hours they work. We don’t see the denial of the basic right to call the place they work in home, to a fellow human being like us, as an act of gross social injustice.

We do fight for stray dogs and we do become vegans to save cattle, but we let these fellow humans remain homeless in our large cities. We got here because we stopped caring. We limited our focus to ourselves—our job, our income, our wealth and our family. We forgot to give, to include, to empathise, to enable, and to take our communities along. We have no stake in our communities, the places we live in and work. We are all nomads occupying slots of economic value that pays us money. We don’t know how every other piece fits in that collage of our lives—every human being that contributes to make our life what it is.

If not for those hundreds of faceless contributors, who would we be? How would we work, eat, commute, live, love and thrive? We have turned into societies that grab, take, and behave with an entitlement mindset. Thus we don’t see those who walk home in hunger and sorrow as people like us. People we abandoned.

To donate money is to take the easy and lazy way out of the problem. Dignified humans do not stand and wait for charity. Into our everyday lives, we have to include our community. We have to take it upon ourselves the responsibility for every single person who enables our lives. We cannot see urban migration as a policy problem that offers pavements as homes and streets as toilets to millions of our fellow humans.

There is no difference between the coveted NRI and the construction worker. The former has nudged his way into the community he lives in and found his voice and power. The latter remains on the fringe, powerless and alone. Let us not stop at merely donating to feed the misplaced. Let us find a way to integrate these people into the places they have come for a better life, so they can call it home. So they won’t be asked to pick up and leave ever again.

(The author is Chairperson, Centre for Investment Education and Learning)
Click here for all the information and analysis you need for tax-saving this financial year

Lockdown is already a matter of life and death for those in India.  Don’t worry, it is coming here faster than you can imagine.  There was already a food shortage and a financial collapse coming before COVID 19 was even a gleam in a scientists eye.

For India’s Laborers, Coronavirus Lockdown Is an Order to Starve

Despite leaders’ decrees on staying home, laborers who live hand-to-mouth say they have no choice but to keep hitting the streets. Here are their stories.

Produce vendors in Delhi last week were hard up for business.

By Maria Abi-Habib and Photographs by 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi has ordered a lockdown of India’s 1.3 billion citizens to fight the spread of coronavirus, urging people to distance themselves socially and work from home.

But social distancing means hunger for many in India, with a work force heavily dependent on manual labor. It would be an unheard-of luxury for the ragpicker or street vendor who lives day to day.

About 80 percent of India’s 470 million workers are in the informal sector, lacking contracts and unprotected by labor laws. Many are manual laborers in the fields, factories and streets of India.

We asked people how they were making ends meet as the economy grinds to a halt with the coronavirus pandemic. India reported 1,024 cases and 27 dead as of Sunday. Here are some of their stories:

Ashu, 12 | ragpicker

Ashu and his two brothers spend their days at one of Delhi’s biggest dumps. They are ragpickers — scavengers who hunt for scrap metal using a giant, rusted sieve to help them sort through the stinking refuse.

If Ashu works really hard, he can earn 53 cents a day. He and his brothers have been unable to go to the dump regularly since the lockdown was announced because if they are caught by the police, they will be beaten.

“I miss my friends,” he said, adding that he and four buddies would meet at the dumpsite every morning, work for a few hours and then play with whatever treasures they found — broken toy cars, tattered dolls and ripped clothing.

“I hear there is a virus from China going around,” Ashu said. “But I’m more afraid of the police and not being able to eat.”

“When the money dries up, we will have to find a way to come back here again,” he said.

Ramchandran Ravidas, 42 | bicycle rickshaw driver

On a Wednesday afternoon, normally peak rush hour in Delhi, Ramchandran Ravidas was bicycling around in big, lazy circles in the middle of a main thoroughfare, boredom, hunger and his empty pockets on his mind.

On a good day, if he has “a lot of energy” he can make up to 450 rupees, or $6, he said. He lives out of the garage he rents his bicycle rickshaw from and worries that he will be evicted soon; he has had no customers since the lockdown.

  •  “If you don’t even have a house, how can you work from home?” Mr. Ravidas said, worry lines furrowing his face. “My home is my work. Today was the first time in my life I had to accept food from a charity.”

He said, for him, it was a race between whether the virus or hunger got to him first.

“I’m not worried about corona; if corona comes to get me, at least this life of misery will be over,” Mr. Ravidas said, breaking into a grin as he roared with laughter.

Baudghiri, 60 | sadhu (religious ascetic)

Walking barefoot along Delhi’s deserted streets, his saffron-colored clothing stained and tattered, Baudghiri said he had not eaten in two days. A sadhu, or religious ascetic, he makes about $1.50 every day by offering prayers to people on the street.
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Mr. Baudghiri, who goes by just one name, had never gone hungry a day in his life, he said, and had always found a meal in Hindu temples or gurdwaras, Sikh places of worship. But they have closed since the lockdown started last week.

While he agreed with the prime minister’s decision to try to prevent the virus’s spread by limiting people’s movement, he was frustrated with the government’s lack of planning for the destitute like him.

“I do not have a house to practice social distancing in,” he said. “I go from place to place, temple to temple, to eat. But the entire city is closed.”

In all his decades of walking across India, Mr. Baudghiri said he had never seen India so paralyzed.

“In every crisis, the gurdwaras, the temples were all open,” he said. “We were still able to feed ourselves and find shelter. I’ve never seen this panic in my entire life.”

Raj Kumari | street sweeper

Sweeping leaves and trash off a deserted street and dumping them into her rusted wheelbarrow, Raj Kumari said the silence of the normal cacophony of Delhi was glorious, but eerie.

She used to sweep Delhi’s streets with her husband, but he died eight years ago. She is now the sole breadwinner for her six children, after her eldest son was laid off from his tech job this past week because of the lockdown.

“It’s just me and the sewer cleaners out here now,” she said.

The lockdown has affected public transportation, and she now walks two hours just to get to work.

“This is what I have to do for money, for life,” she said. “Even if the streets are empty, I have to come out. I don’t have the pleasure of staying at home, this is my duty.”

The government has never provided Ms. Kumari, who does not know her exact age, with gloves or masks for her job. But one of her daughters forbade her from working without protective gear during the pandemic and gave her a mask that her school had donated to students to protect against Delhi’s infamous pollution.

“I’m not afraid of corona,” Ms. Kumari said. “Why would anyone fear death when it is time for God to take you?”

‘They need to help people like us’
Mohan Singh, 18 | fruit seller

Every morning, Mohan Singh and his father pile their carts with fruit and wheel their loads to work, on a busy neighborhood street corner. Although their jobs are deemed necessary and permissible during the lockdown, they say customers are too afraid to come to their carts. By midmorning, they had served one customer between them.

“If we are afraid of this disease, we will die in our homes,” Mr. Singh said, adding that he and his father provide for their entire family of six.

Mr. Singh said he was worried that the government was going to help big businesses and that small businesses like his would be overlooked. Although the government announced a $22 billion relief package to support the millions left unemployed because of the crisis, some say people in the informal work force, like Mr. Singh, will have trouble getting help.

“They need to help people like us,” he said. “There are more people working on the streets than India’s biggest companies. If we close, no one can eat.”

‘If we stay at home, my family goes hungry and India goes thirsty’

Many India

Arjun Chauhan, 18 | water deliverermage

n homes lack running water or water safe enough to drink, making Arjun Chauhan’s job a necessity during the lockdown. He zipped across Delhi’s streets on his moped bike, stacked high with leaking water bottles.

“If we stay at home, my family goes hungry and India goes thirsty,” Mr. Chauhan said, adding that his parents and five siblings rely on his wages.

Since the lockdown, Mr. Chauhan has seen his daily earnings of about $8 cut in half. He said he had been unable to reach all his customers because the police had prevented him from deliveries and even beat him for being on the streets although under the lockdown rules, deliveries of necessary items like medicine and water are supposed to be allowed.

Updated 22m ago
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Ya, it is really easy for the wealthy to get through anything.  Money buys a lot of safety, supplies, shelter and ammo.  The poor always suffer the most.  

Virus Outbreak Highlights Structural Inequalities

Amnesty members declaring that they are human rights defenders

As the COVID-19 pandemic spreads, people across the world face the devastating impact it is having now on families, friends and communities, and will continue to have long into the future. This is a human rights crisis in the most immediate sense – and a reminder of our common humanity and that we are all equal in dignity and human rights.

The international human rights system as we know it today was born from the lessons of the 1930s and 1940s and the hopes of a better future. Today, human rights are central to the situation we all face. At their heart, human rights are both a protection from the power of the state and a demand that our governments use their considerable power to protect our lives, health and wellbeing.

In the next days and weeks, we will analyse developments from a human rights perspective and publish updates. And as we do this, we will continue to scrutinise actions of governments here and elsewhere in the world.

What we want to see from the government

All of us in the UK have responsibilities towards each other in this crisis, but the government has an overarching duty to protect our health and wellbeing. It can only fulfil its obligations if it puts human rights at the centre of its response.

In introducing emergency measures, it is vital from the outset that the UK Government ensures human rights are at the centre of all prevention, preparedness, containment and treatment efforts, in order to best protect public health, welfare, and support the groups and individuals most at risk.

The government must provide full economic support to protect people’s right to a home, to work and to an adequate standard of living. They will need to take action and extend the arms of state protection and support, perhaps more widely than ever before.

These measures must focus first and foremost on the most vulnerable, those who are already struggling and those who are least protected.

Coronavirus Emergency Powers Bill

In these exceptional circumstances and the public health emergency, the government is introducing emergency powers. This must be done with care to protect and respect our human rights. These measures must be temporary, be subject to regular scrutiny. and undergo genuine review before any extension. The provisions in the Bill must be proportionate and any derogations of human rights must be in accord with international human rights law.

Who are those most at risk?

The virus doesn’t discriminate, although we do know that certain groups appear to be at greater risk of severe illness and death. According to the WHO, older people and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes or heart disease) seem to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.

People living in poverty and homelessness will find it much harder to access preventive measures. They may be working on zero-hour contracts, reliant on benefits and subject to punitive measures under the system of Universal Credit.

We have seen how, in countries which have already been in lockdown, refuges and women’s organisations have been raising awareness of what self-isolation means for women living with violent and controlling partners. In the UK organisations working on domestic violence are chronically underfunded and, to date, no additional provision has been made to cope with the impact of coronavirus. Victims with ‘No Recourse to Public Funds’ face additional barriers and insecurity as they cannot access life-saving refuges and are barred from other forms of public support.

A shortage of care services (childcare, healthcare, elderly care) will have a disproportionate impact on women as providers of unpaid care work. Coronavirus will exacerbate a situation where cuts to public spending have already fallen on women. The UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) has reiterated its previous concern (dating back to 2009) about the disproportionately negative impact of austerity measures on women, who constitute the vast majority of single parents and are more likely to be engaged in informal, temporary or precarious forms of employment.

How should the most vulnerable be protected?

We know that there are real challenges in the UK and Coronavirus is bringing these into sharp focus. In 2018, Professor Philip Alston – UN expert on extreme poverty and human rights – visited the UK and reported how 14 million people are living in poverty, dependent on food banks and charities for their next meal. He documented the plight of homeless people, some of whom don’t have a safe place for their children to sleep. Underpinning this he highlighted how successive governments eroded the healthcare system and undermined the social security safety net. In this context, we welcome the government’s commitment to food vouchers for children who get free school meals, and to keep schools open for frontline workers and vulnerable children.

Amnesty International and its partners have previously reported poor treatment of undocumented and irregular migrant people and their exclusion from services such as healthcare. This has been a feature of policy over successive governments and many years, whether by barring people from such services, making them unaffordable, or deterring their use by threat of being reported to immigration enforcement.

The pandemic intensifies the risks these measures present to many already vulnerable people and the wider public. It is vital that their impact is urgently assessed and mitigated to ensure individual and public health. There should be no barrier to health care at this time.

How we’re coming together

While we see the stories of incidents of racism – acts driven by fear and ignorance – we also see how communities come together to support one another, through individual and collective acts of kindness, whether looking out for elderly neighbours or mass applause to demonstrate their appreciation to health workers. We’re proud that Amnesty International groups and activists are playing their part, offering support to those most in need in their communities.

What must be done next

We welcome measures including mortgage relief and support for businesses – but have been concerned by the significant gaps and questions that remained, including for those that are renting their homes. We are therefore pleased that the Prime Minister has announced he will act to protect renters from eviction. However, there’s no commitment to supporting those working on precarious contracts, often without sick pay or safety net and this need to be urgently addressed. So, while there is much to be welcomed, there is clearly a lot more that needs to be done and it is now vital that the government give equal focus to supporting those most vulnerable.

The UK will survive the COVID-19 outbreak, not least thanks to the front-line services that put their lives on the line to deliver our right to health. But more than ever before, we need the government to do more to protect those who are already highly vulnerable, as well as those who may become so in the weeks and months ahead.

One might think that because everyone is staying home, the world would be a lot safer.  NOT SO…

Here’s how the coronavirus lockdown is affecting the Kansas City crime rate

Police Car On The Street
KCPD has answered questions about Kansas City’s crime rate during the coronavirus lockdown

Since Tuesday, the Kansas City metro area has been under a stay-at-home order requiring residents to remain inside their homes unless they’re engaged in activities “essential to the health and safety” of themselves, family members or friends.

With most of the city staying put unless they need groceries, hardware or the like—you can’t even outfit your home office at Nebraska Furniture Mart anymore—many have wondered what’s going on with the city’s crime rate.

A lot of people have wondered about this—to the extent that the city’s police decided to make a statement about it via Twitter.

kcpolice

@kcpolice

We continue to get questions about how our calls for service are being impacted. Here’s the last seven days compared to the same time period last year for Priority 1 and 2 calls:

View image on Twitter

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25 people are talking about this

A second percent drop in more serious calls to the police is “anecdotally” significant, though the police cautioned that they would have to dig a little deeper—perhaps looking at conditions like weather, major events in town and the like—to present a better analysis.

Still, it seems like good news: There is, at the very least, not a crime wave underway during this pandemic.

CATEGORIES: NEWS
Speaking of animals… criminals, hoodlums, cults, gangs and the Mafia, are not going to let a good catastrophe go to waste.

Coronavirus Death Smog: Is China Burning Thousands of Infected …

Feb 10, 2020 … … clusters in China is raising speculation of China burning piles of bodies. … the actual severity of the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak is piling up.

Coronavirus outbreak: Video shows bodies in halls of China hospital

Jan 24, 2020 … Disturbing new video shows dead bodies piling up in a hospital in Wuhan, China, as the coronavirus outbreak continues to spiral out of control.

Coronavirus update today: US deaths pass China, virus could travel …

6 days ago … New York in crisis: The head of the state’s funeral directors association said the Big Apple could soon see dead bodies piling up, as morgues and .

COVID-19: Ecuador struggles to bury the dead as bodies pile up …

3 days ago … COVID-19: Ecuador struggles to bury the dead as bodies pile up. Anger and frustration in Ecuador where families face unusual challenges as …

Mar 12, 2020 … … the director of the Behesht-e Masoumeh morgue in Qom, told state-run television at the time that there was now a “pile up” of bodies at the …

Coronavirus: ‘Dead bodies pile up on floor’ at hospital overrun by …

Jan 24, 2020 … Nurses and others are seen stepping around the bodies, which are covered by white sheets, in a corridor packed with people apparently infected …

Mar 19, 2020 … Coffins pile up and corpses are sealed off in homes as Bergamo’s … The army intervenes to move bodies from the main cemetery in Bergamo.

Bodies ‘pile up’ in morgue as Iran feels strain of coronavirus

Mar 6, 2020 … Under Islamic tradition in Iran, corpses are typically washed with soap and water before burial. But two medical workers in Qom told CNN that in …

Mar 24, 2020 … Soldiers have found dead or dying residents in multiple abandoned care homes in Spain, revealed the country’s defence minister. The Spanish …

Bodies of unidentified missing pile up in Mexico′s morgues | DW …

Jan 7, 2020 … Relatives of the missing often face lengthy waits for any information, with unidentified bodies piling up in morgues.

Dead Bodies Are Piling Up – Newser

2 days ago … There are the new dead. And then there are the bodies waiting in overcrowded mortuaries to be buried as cities struggle to meet demand and

(NEWSER) – There are the new dead. And then there are the bodies waiting in overcrowded mortuaries to be buried as cities struggle to meet demand and families wrestle with rules on social distancing that make the usual funeral rituals impossible, the AP reports. Med Alliance Group, a medical distributor in Illinois, is besieged by calls and emails from cities around the country. Each asks the same thing: Send more refrigerated trailers so that we can handle a situation we never could have imagined. “They’re coming from all over: From hospitals, health systems, coroner’s offices, VA facilities, county and state health departments, state emergency departments and funeral homes,” said Christie Penzol, a spokeswoman for Med Alliance. “It’s heart-wrenching.”

The company has rented all its trailers and there’s an 18-week wait for new materials to build more, she said. With US medical experts and even President Trump now estimating the death toll from the coronavirus pandemic could reach 240,000 nationwide, the sheer practicalities of death—where to put the bodies—are worrying just about everyone as cities, hospitals, and private medical groups clamor to secure additional storage. The need is compounded by private mortuary space that is occupied longer than usual as people wait to bury their loved ones—regardless of how they died—because rules on social distancing make planning funerals difficult. It’s a crisis being repeated worldwide, from Spain to Ecuador to New York City.

(Read more coronavirus stories.)

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Having looked at the timelines in China, Italy, Spain and now in the UK, it’s clear the science/medical advice to governments etc is not evidence based with the (so called) advice just to pacify a panicking public’s demand for guidance and action.

Here is why: the model the medical advice is based on – which is secondary school year 1 biology stuff – to explain how rapidly cell division takes place, bears no relation to a real virus. Yes, everyone knows that a cell divides itself into two. The two cells divide again into four, the four divide into eight, eight into 16 etc.

Great at giving young students an idea of the curve of cell division but nothing at all to do with how viruses work in the affected organism. Coronavirus (others are available) can take between one and 14 days to show the symptoms, so a person who displays the symptoms within 24 hours may indeed only pass it on to two others before self isolating or not as the case may be, but the people who take longer will pass it on to many, many more.

One hypothesis on this suggests a person who takes 12 – 14 days to show the symptoms and who is making repeated visits to their supermarket for toilet roll due to panic buying, could pass on the virus to as many as 100 other people.

Also there are people out there who will carry and pass on the virus but who will not develop any symptoms and without proper testing will go unnoticed and therefore uncounted.

So calculating or predictions (total guesswork) on the spread of the virus based on one person infecting two and so on is utterly incorrect and borders on professional misconduct.

Lockdown or containment in China, Italy, Spain, France and almost here in the UK, has and is making a bad situation worse and hasn’t slowed down the pace of it

Lockdown or containment can only have an effect if it’s introduced early, as in when the first half a dozen people are tested positive. Even then if they have been to work, on a bus or train to another town it’s most likely to be too late.

All the lockdowns so far were implemented weeks too late to have any impact on the speed of spread of the virus, due to the high numbers of already infected people or carriers dispersing through their countries or abroad.

Because they have all been too late in their introduction, not one country, city or village around the world has seen a slowing of the rapidity of the virus.

However the combined effects of the global lockdowns will have a far greater and devastating effect than the virus itself, as lockdowns will now cause the greatest global economic depression and mass unemployment the world has ever seen, making the global financial crash in 2008 completely insignificant.

Vic Thomas
Catfirth

MY FINAL THOUGHTS ON THIS WHOLE THING

This virus is dehumanizing mankind even further than we have already come.  People are unable to render aid to their sick and dying loved ones, Unable to meet together with family and friends for comfort and encouragement.  No gentle kisses or tender hugs to help us get through these perilous times.  When our loved ones die, they die alone, their bodies are often forgotten or mistreated as their loved ones anxiously await news of their condition.  There can be no family burials, in fact there will likely be no burial at all as the mortuaries and cemetaries are overflowing.   And when this is all over, what will we have become??

Thanks to TECHNOLOGY, the members of  our families have already been alienated from each other, we have a generation of children who have no idea who they are or why they are here. They have been so dumbed down they cannot even read, write or work simple math problems, they think that using drugs to change your consciousness and communicate with other-wordly beings is normal, they sit in their rooms all day and play video games or watch horror on television, drinking blood and ingesting babies body parts is just part of their anti-aging, natural health diet, they hate anyone who does not believe what they believe and they will kill for financial gain.  They WORSHIP ghouls and monsters who sacrifice their friends and family to make it to the top.  They believe that they are not only as smart as THE CREATOR but that they can become GODS themselves.  

We are looking at moving into the world the globalists have planned, where animals have the roam of the earth and people are locked op in little 200 square foot boxcar apartments stacked to the sky and travel on foot or via bicycle.  Cut off from our families and friends because there is no more travel by automobile, airplane or train.  We will be getting our work and our entertainment pumped to our brain via AI.  Our every move, every deed, every thought will be monitored and even forecast ahead of time.  WE will have no money but what the powers that be alot to us, based on our level of submission to the state. Our health will not only be monitored but controlled by our overlords and they will take our freedom from us when and how ever they choose.  
Perversion, torture, slavery will be the normal way of life.
I would rather just take a pass… THANK YOU.
And if you think any of that is a joke…  You better do your research.  It is all laid out for you, if you have a mind to discern it.
Please see the following Articles on this site.   They are ALL RELATED!
Be blessed, be safe and be well.
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